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Wilburton Theatre Group

Wilburton Theatre Group


NODA Review 15 April 2016
Wilburton Theatre Group
Directed by Emily Starr
Assistant Director Bryannie Quarrie
Musical Director Maria McElroy

Big Fish 12-chair is the new, small-cast version for 12 actors of a short-lived Broadway musical featuring music and lyrics by Andrew Lippa based on the novel by Daniel Wallace and follows on from the Tim Burton’s film of the same name.

At the centre of the story is Edward Bloom the main character, who is on his deathbed and reliving his “exaggerated” tales of life. Fish stories are the tales Edward tells his son, Will and are, of course, what “Big Fish” is all about. I’m telling you all this because Big Fish was a new one on me.

Apparently “the musical has elements from the book and movie, as well as a few new takes on characters and situations”, and who am I to dispute that, never having seen either? What I do know is, it is a great show: full of lovely songs and tunes: lively and at times sentimental.

Much of the music is complex but the singers and The Ashton Stomp Octet under the musical direction of Maria McElroy did a splendid job. Excellent choreography too by Emily Starr and Guest Choreographer David Mallabone.

This role of Edward, teller of fishy-tales was tailor-made for Tim Meikle who was absolutely outstanding, producing a performance full of energy and skill with the good vocal talent.

Laura Bryant played Sandra his wife giving an excellent performance topped off with a lovely voice. I Don’t Need a Roof was beautiful. Edward and Sandra’s love story is brought to life through a multitude of ages, from 15 to 50, as the story moves from present-day to past and back again.

Edward tells Will about how, as a teenager, he met a Witch, played by Shelley Martin who has an amazing voice. About the time he faced down a Giant, confidently played from great height by Aiden Roe who was terrorising his small Alabama hometown. And the story of how he met Will’s mother, Sandra at the circus.

We enjoyed fine performances from Aidan Meikle, following in family tradition as Young Will and Josh Greene as grown up Will, who is now about to become a father himself with wife Josephine played well by Becky Gilbert. There was nice empathy between this couple.

Apart from Edward, Sandra and grown-up Will, the other nine actors, doubled as school friends fishermen, wedding guests, circus performers, and college students, zipping in and out of the firstrate costumes with aplomb. Every single member of cast gave unstinting commitment to the production.

Barry Starr’s set was impressive having multiple functions, swiftly transforming into a bedroom, a hospital, a circus, a cave, a meadow . . . the possibilities appeared endless. There was even a river through which a mermaid “swam”. Great stuff. Well done too to the whole technical team.

Sound and Lighting were spot on cue the whole time. Hair, Make-up, Costumes, Props and the lovely daffodil backdrop looked great and the scene changes exceptionally swift.

The matter of facing up to one’s own mortality and the subsequent funeral was well handled.

Emotive without being morbid. Part of this, of course, would be in the writing but the Director has to bring it to fruition and here Director Emily Starr did a great job.

Wilburton Theatre Group can always be relied on to offer their public something different and this show was just that. It overflowed with humour, emotion, lively performances and excellent singing.

It is a show which reminds one why we love going to the theatre.
ulie Petrucci
Regional Representative
NODA Review 15 April 2016
NODA East District Four South.


Posted on 02/05/2016


Make Believe Productions

Make Believe Productions


Return of Neverland

Full Review

Production Reviews:

“The haunting and downright apocalyptic harmonies sang at the end of act one will blow audiences away”

“A well-thought out, well-written and well-performed production”

“The show was very good, flawless and smooth”

Return of Neverland

Musical Plot:
Peter Pan and Tinkerbell are struggling to keep the spirit of Neverland alive. Over the last thirty years the magic in Neverland has rapidly decreased, leaving Peter Pan and The Lost Boys grounded and Captain Hook and his crew docked. With nothing to fight for and no adventures to be had, Neverland has come to a standstill with no hope of a revival, or is there? With a little manipulation a secret is revealed that may not only save the island but create more power than Neverland has ever seen before. Will it end up in the right hands? Or will this be the end of Neverland for good? With twists in the tales and shocking revealing’s, Neverland is about to have its first adventure in years!


Posted on 19/04/2016


Farnworth Little Theatre

Snake in the Grass video

Here are some of Adrian Mottram's images from Snake in the Grass in a YouTube video along with the haunting music of Max Ablitzer's Ghost Song. youTube


Posted on 27/01/2016


Southwick Players

Be My Baby, won several of the Brighton and Hove Arts Council Theatre Awards in December 2015

Wins at Brighton & Hove Arts Council
Awards Night, 10th Dec.

Huge congratulations to the Director
(Sally Diver), cast and crew of BE MY BABY,
with nominations for
Best Costume Design
(Milla Hills and Margaret Skeet)
Best Sound Design (Kieran Pollard)
Best Lighting Design (Martin Oakley)
Best Director (Sally Diver)
Arthur Churchill Award for Excellence
Best Supporting Actress (Alice Wesby)
and winning the following: Best Set Design: (Martin Oakley and Sally Diver)
Best Technical Achievement: (Martin Oakley / The Set Team)
Best Stage Crew: Southwick Players
Best Publicity: Gary Cook
and Best Overall Show

pictured l-r Kerry Williams, Phoebe Cook, Nancy Wesby, Alice Wesby

Cast, crew and backstage team receive their awards

L-R: Phoebe Cook, Milla Hills, Kerry Williams, Ian Churchill, Nancy Wesby, Sally Diver, Gary Cook, Alice Wesby, Martin Oakley, Debbie Creissen, Sharon Churchill, Anita Jones


Posted on 07/01/2016


Play Safe
by Jane Hilliard & Paul A J Rudelhoff

Play Safe, West Moors Drama - West Moors Memorial Hall

By Stour & Avon Magazine | Posted: November 27, 2015

West Moors Drama chose a comedy for its latest production but not a familiar farce as this was written by experienced player and previous director Jane Hilliard, together with Paul A J Rudelhoff. They created a very funny play.

The action takes place in a home for retired entertainers (a splendid set which complemented the storyline) where the residents endeavour to relive their television roles. Into this world of eccentricity come a couple of likely lads on community service. They are not what they seem to be and pandemonium ensues as the story unfolds.

Fairlawn is run by Lance Kennedy who was previously a game-show host and Peter Wright does a good job with the part. Matron, his wife, is well characterised by Shelagh Rundle with the forceful voice and persona of a real battle-axe. Completing the staff is domestic help Carina and Joan Harrison impresses as she cleverly makes this pivotal role her own.

Miriam Maplethorpe, previously a television detective, is ideal for Anne Maynard who is delightfully dotty. She is a perfect foil for Peter Legrand – the capable Alan Dester – who recalls his career as a Shakespearean actor and quotes the Bard at every opportunity. Another resident remembering his glory days is Charlie Chuckles (West Moors Drama stalwart Derek Kearey) and his first appearance unclothed except for a blanket brings the house down.

Neither Florrie Fortuna – Jeanie Ellis is admirable – or Mavis Fulbright (the multi -talented Jane Hilliard) are as mad as they originally seem, revealing secrets as the plot thickens. Teenage brothers Ben - well played by Alex Willmott - and Lee (Tom Clifford shows promise) are not in Fairlawn to pay their debt to society and the boys are vital to the intrigue. This pair are making their debuts with the group and will, hopefully, continue to gain confidence and learn from experienced actors.

Tom Martin directed and produced, he must be congratulated for keeping up a fast pace and using the cast to their best advantage. Also taking the cameo role of Barry the Brain, he epitomises the spirit of amateur theatre so look out for West Moors Drama productions in the future.

Play Safe continues until Saturday, there may be a few tickets left but don’t delay if you want to see an original comedy.

By Pat Scott


Posted on 13/12/2015


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